Search
  • JULIANNA BOYLAN

Adding, Subtracting, Layering

Updated: May 7, 2018

Dance making is strange. It is filled with highs and lows. Being in the space with your fellow creators and letting intuition course through your body, creates an electricity that nothing can match. But simultaneously it makes you question everything about intentionality and how the endeavor is fulfilling the artistic goal.  This thesis project has infiltrated my life and is the subject of my thoughts, even when I do not intend it to be. Everything has the possibility to be inspiration utilized in rehearsal. A strange dream, a soundtrack from a terrible Netflix movie, and inflating balloons have all made it into the space. Body part dances, quiet to loud improvisational scores, creation of a cacophonous space: all new additions to the rehearsal space this spring. This semester has been about clarifying our intention, strengthening our group dynamic/ relationships to each other and shaping the work for presentation at the Senior Thesis Concert, April 27th and 28th. 


We, which includes Danielle Mastricola, Nina Crouchelli, Michelle Burns, and me, have added  movement phrases and improvisational tasks to our word bank and used this collection of shared knowledge to turn the dance inside out and upside down. During one rehearsal we wrote down all of the sections that we have, all autonomous of each other, and arranged the dance in different orders. Adding, subtracting, layering. It is about pouring specificity into the work at this point of the process. 


I look forward to sharing the world we have been so busy building throughout the year with you.

0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Editing in Dance

Dance is a subjective beast. Its the embodiment of the slippery line between movement, text, relationship, story, and life. Recently I have been grappling with questions of how I am attracted to a per

Coordinating Awkwardness

Hello I’m Julianna Boylan, a member of the senior class of 2018. I have had the privilege of working with three generous movers as I conduct research for my thesis, which will be presented in April 20